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Canada's Core Public Infrastructure Survey: Culture, Sport, and Public Housing

Canada's Core Public Infrastructure Survey: Culture, Sport, and Public Housing

Statistics Canada, in partnership with Infrastructure Canada, has launched a catalogue of the state of the nation's infrastructure to provide statistical information on the stock, condition, performance, and asset management strategies of Canada's core public infrastructure assets. This second release presents findings on culture, recreation and sports facilities; and public social and affordable housing.

Key Findings:

Over three-fifths of every type of arts and culture facility were in good or very good physical condition.

  • Almost two-fifths of presentation and performance spaces and galleries have been constructed since 2000, compared with one-third of libraries and one-sixth of museums and archives.
  • Libraries (46 years) and presentation and performance spaces (41 years) had the longest average expected useful life among publicly-owned arts and culture facilities. Galleries were expected to last for 34 years on average and museums and archives for 16 years.
  • 79.8 percent of arts and culture facilities and 76.9 percent of multi-purpose facilities were reported as being accessible.

Approximately 30,000 sports fields, community centres, tennis courts, skate parks, curling rinks, and stadiums were reported as publically owned in the survey

  • Nearly three-fifths of these facilities were outdoor sports fields, while 22.5 percent were outdoor tennis courts and 12.3 percent were community centres.
  • Around half of outdoor ice arenas and indoor single-pad ice arenas were reported as being in good or very good physical condition, while one-fifth of indoor single-pad ice arenas were reported to be in poor or very poor condition.
  • Approximately 70 percent of all recreation and sports facilities allowed for accessibility.

Municipalities own over two-fifths of public social and affordable housing units

  • While regional and provincial governments accounted for more than three-quarters of publicly-owned social and affordable housing structures in 2016, the structures owned by municipalities (23.5%) represented 43.8 percent of all units.
  • Ontario led in the number of social and affordable housing units (127,064), followed by Alberta (33,870), British Columbia (22,124) and Saskatchewan (17,822).
  • Around one-third of apartment buildings with five or more storeys (35.4%), semi-detached structures (33.8%) and row houses (29.6%) were reported as being in poor or very poor condition.
  • Just over one-quarter of apartment buildings with fewer than five storeys (25.9%) and single-detached houses (25.8%) were reported as being in poor or very poor condition.

Two-thirds of all public social and affordable housing units are in apartment buildings

  • While apartment buildings represented 9.0 percent of all structures in 2016, they contained the largest share (63.0%) of publicly-owned social and affordable housing units.
  • Under a quarter of housing units were in row house structures, while 6.0 percent were in semi-detached houses and 6.6 percent were in single-detached houses.
  • Almost three-quarters of the 39,097 public social and affordable housing structures were constructed from 1970 to 1999, while 19.0% were built from 1940 to 1969.
  • Since 2000, 5.2 percent of social and affordable housing structures have been constructed.

Just over half of public social and affordable housing units and one-quarter of all  culture, recreation and sports facilities have an asset management plan

  • Over half (56.1%) of owners reported having an asset management plan for social and affordable housing in 2016. More than two-fifths (44.7%) of owners without a plan intended to implement one within four years, while 21.3% of those without an asset management plan in place did not anticipate implementing one in the future.
  • Just over one-quarter (25.1%) of the public organizations owning culture, recreation and sports facilities had an asset management plan in 2016. Almost two-fifths (38.8%) of those without a plan in 2016 anticipated implementing one within four years.

Consistent with the key findings of the survey, most provincial jurisdictions have outlined requirements for municipalities to implement an asset management plan in order to receive federal gas tax funding.  A typical asset management plan includes a comprehensive state of the infrastructure report, a level of service section, an asset management strategy, and a financial strategy to bridge the infrastructure deficit over the medium and long-term. Contact us here to learn how PSD can assist with the development and implementation of an effective asset management plan and ensure that your municipality can meet provincial requirements to receive funding.

The full release from Statistics Canada can be found here.